Madison Avenue Watch Week

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Ever watch reality TV shows like “Naked and Afraid” or “Alaskan Bush People” ? Our modern lives are so disconnected from the natural world that it’s fascinating to drop all traces of our technology laden cushy lives to see how a butt-naked couple survives 2 weeks on bugs and berries. Granted there is the safety net of the film crew who no-doubt  swoop in with doctors should a naked life be in danger. “Alaskan Bush People” explore the lives of the Brown family —blase’ when face to face with the producer’s iPhone for the first time. They meet daily challenges of bears tearing up their house, broken boat motors, getting stuck on a desolate road with a flat tire and cutting down trees for lumber to make their house. They love every minute of their daily strife and despite their difficulties. But I digress…

Our lost connection to the natural world parallel another world— that of mechanical watches. Watches are no longer a necessity— they are a luxury. I’ve been told over and over that cell phones have replaced the need for a wrist watch. However I take exception to that point and find a flick of the wrist reveals the time of day faster than pulling out that other machine. But watch aficionados are in love with the intricate workings of these tiny machines and appreciate it on many levels. It’s so much more than a watch. It signifies slowing down, the love of handmade objects, and getting back to basics.

In Switzerland, white-coated craftsmen labor at their workbench with tweezers looking through a magnifying glass and placing minuscule gears and pins in sequential order to create movements and assembling the end product—the watch itself.  The lengthy process takes weeks sometimes months to complete and is what makes the piece an object of desire. The admiration is based on time-honored methods passed down through the generations. It sits on a wrist as a sign of defiance to modern age—signaling a return to things that matter, and a respect for the past.

But it is a business—watches need to be sold and the Horlogerie world has minions of marketers who are never at a loss for platforms and ideas to drum up sales. To that end  the marketers conjured up Madison Avenue Watch Week for NYC and this is it’s sixth year.  The find time starts on April 13th—sponsored by the most prestigious  brand names that span the Swiss generations.  They will show Basel’s latest releases to the well-heeled enthusiasts, sometimes partnering with a former astronaut as with Breitling’s Emergency Watch or a wildlife  photographer as with Jaeger LeCoultre whom express their admiration for the timely world.

Interested?  The elegant fun is happening up down the pristine streets of Madison Avenue. The champagne will be flowing and the stories too.

Last night Hublot kicked off the celebrations with a cocktail party at their boutique. Hublot does things in a big way just like their watches, so they timed the release of Aaron Sigmond’s DRIVE TIME: Watches Inspired by Automobiles, Motorcycles, and Racing with the event. Aaron was on hand to sign copies of the book ( see event photos below). Scheduled events are throughout the week so check in with the main website below.

To request an invitation:
http://madisonavenuewatchweek.com/

 

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To request an invitation and see listing of watch brands:
http://madisonavenuewatchweek.com/

 

About Mimi Lombardo

I'm a seasoned fashion editor, stylist and writer. I write about fashion and luxury from an insider's perspective. Check out my styling portfolio at mimi-lombardo.format.com.
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